Expert Interview

Josephine Akia | PELUM

Expert Interview

Josephine Akia PELUM

Josephine Akia Luyimbazi is Country coordinator PELUM Uganda.This regional network of more than 250 civil society organisations in 12 east, central and southern African countries, works to improve the livelihoods of small-scale farmers and the sustainability of farming communities, by fostering ecological land use management. 

For Josephine, YALTA’s best practices contribute to changing the narrative around agriculture, making youth see agroecology as an opportunity to change their livelihoods and have a stable income by showing clear examples of success. 

Expert Interview

Josephine Akia | PELUM

Window, Sleeve, Waist, Eyelash

Josephine Akia Luyimbazi | Country Coordinator PELUM

According to Josephine, ‘Everyone, young or old, needs a mentor. You need to hear from someone who has done it. We learned that we can influence youth and have more youth involved in agriculture with the right mentorship.’ She also saw value in the involvement of different stakeholders, from lawyers and bankers to development partners and the private sector. We showed youth that, ‘this is possible, agroecology can be scaled to business’. It helps demystify the issues around access to finance, and change the narrative. As Josephine says, ‘YALTA showed us that giving different value chain actors space to interact is the easiest way to make connections.’

PELUM organised the Caravan, a project that took youth to the reality of agroecology on the ground. In her view, this event ‘Was an excellent way of changing mindset and alluring the youth into adopting agroecology. Youth are curious, and innovative. This was a great opportunity to interact, to see and learn from a growing network of peers and supporters.’

More youth are now involved in agroecology, in terms of policy processes, and providing advisory services to fellows - now they are mentors. The project has generated different agroecology business-related options. There is youth in production and banking, and in processing, who are adding value. Josephine believes that ‘YALTA has shown the young that they do not need to do it all, but that what they do is compatible.’ 





'Continue innovating, there is a lot of potential. I look at youth as a forest that is full of ideas, innovation and creativity that can change this world. We need more youthful voices,so stand up and speak up. We need to be invited to the table to air out your views.

- Josephine Akia

'Continue innovating, there is a lot of potential. I look at youth as a forest that is full of ideas, innovation and creativity that can change this world. We need more youthful voices,so stand up and speak up. We need to be invited to the table to air out your views.

Josephine Akia

Josephine Akia Luyimbazi is Country coordinator PELUM Uganda.This regional network of more than 250 civil society organisations in 12 east, central and southern African countries, works to improve the livelihoods of small-scale farmers and the sustainability of farming communities, by fostering ecological land use management. 

For Josephine, YALTA’s best practices contribute to changing the narrative around agriculture, making youth see agroecology as an opportunity to change their livelihoods and have a stable income by showing clear examples of success. 

According to Josephine, ‘Everyone, young or old, needs a mentor. You need to hear from someone who has done it. We learned that we can influence youth and have more youth involved in agriculture with the right mentorship.’ She also saw value in the involvement of different stakeholders, from lawyers and bankers to development partners and the private sector. We showed youth that, ‘this is possible, agroecology can be scaled to business’. It helps demystify the issues around access to finance, and change the narrative. As Josephine says, ‘YALTA showed us that giving different value chain actors space to interact is the easiest way to make connections.’



Window, Sleeve, Waist, Eyelash

Josephine Akia Luyimbazi | Country Coordinator PELUM

PELUM organised the Caravan, a project that took youth to the reality of agroecology on the ground. In her view, this event ‘Was an excellent way of changing mindset and alluring the youth into adopting agroecology. Youth are curious, and innovative. This was a great opportunity to interact, to see and learn from a growing network of peers and supporters.’

More youth are now involved in agroecology, in terms of policy processes, and providing advisory services to fellows - now they are mentors. The project has generated different agroecology business-related options. There is youth in production and banking, and in processing, who are adding value. Josephine believes that ‘YALTA has shown the young that they do not need to do it all, but that what they do is compatible.’ 





'Continue innovating, there is a lot of potential. I look at youth as a forest that is full of ideas, innovation and creativity that can change this world. We need more youthful voices,so stand up and speak up. We need to be invited to the table to air out your views.

Josephine Akia

Josephine Akia Luyimbazi is Country coordinator PELUM Uganda.This regional network of more than 250 civil society organisations in 12 east, central and southern African countries, works to improve the livelihoods of small-scale farmers and the sustainability of farming communities, by fostering ecological land use management. 

For Josephine, YALTA’s best practices contribute to changing the narrative around agriculture, making youth see agroecology as an opportunity to change their livelihoods and have a stable income by showing clear examples of success. 

According to Josephine, ‘Everyone, young or old, needs a mentor. You need to hear from someone who has done it. We learned that we can influence youth and have more youth involved in agriculture with the right mentorship.’ She also saw value in the involvement of different stakeholders, from lawyers and bankers to development partners and the private sector. We showed youth that, ‘this is possible, agroecology can be scaled to business’. It helps demystify the issues around access to finance, and change the narrative. As Josephine says, ‘YALTA showed us that giving different value chain actors space to interact is the easiest way to make connections.’



Window, Sleeve, Waist, Eyelash

Josephine Akia Luyimbazi | Country Coordinator PELUM

PELUM organised the Caravan, a project that took youth to the reality of agroecology on the ground. In her view, this event ‘Was an excellent way of changing mindset and alluring the youth into adopting agroecology. Youth are curious, and innovative. This was a great opportunity to interact, to see and learn from a growing network of peers and supporters.’

More youth are now involved in agroecology, in terms of policy processes, and providing advisory services to fellows - now they are mentors. The project has generated different agroecology business-related options. There is youth in production and banking, and in processing, who are adding value. Josephine believes that ‘YALTA has shown the young that they do not need to do it all, but that what they do is compatible.’